News & Resources


Inquire Before You Hire: Prospective Employees and Restrictive Covenant Agreements

You have finally found a prospective employee who meets all of your search criteria and is a superstar (or prospective superstar) in the field. You want to move forward with the hiring process on an expedited basis. You extend a generous offer, which is promptly accepted. And then you discover, one way or another, that this individual has a restrictive covenant agreement with a prior employer. What should you do? What if you don’t find out about the Covenant Agreement until after you have hired the individual?

THE SUPREME COURT’S EPIC DECISION: The Beginning of the End of Employee Class Actions?

The issue of whether these class action waivers are enforceable has been a contentious issue. Specifically, federal courts have disagreed whether arbitration agreements containing a class action waiver violate the National Labor Relations Act, thus rendering them invalid and unenforceable. On May 21, 2018, the Supreme Court resolved this issue in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, holding that agreements requiring employees to arbitrate claims on an individual basis are enforceable. Here’s what you need to know.

Data Breach Notifications: Your Obligations Will Vary from State to State

It’s a virtual certainty that your business possesses personally-identifiable information of individual residents of different states – whether customers, employees, or third parties – that could be compromised if your business suffers a data breach.

All 50 states have now enacted some form of legislation requiring private or governmental entities to notify individuals in such states of security breaches involving their personally identifiable information. Consequently, if your company finds itself as the victim of a data breach, a swift response will likely be required – including a quick assessment of your obligations under the data breach laws of various jurisdictions.

Should We Notify Our Insurance Company?

On March 28, 2018, a federal judge in Atlanta excused Fulton County’s insurance company from paying more than $6.5 million. Valuable insurance coverage was lost because the County failed to provide timely notice to its liability insurance company. Insurance policies are contracts between the insurance company and the insured. Those contracts require the insured to […]

Susan J. Berlin Joins FH2

Susan joins the FH2 telecommunications team and has an extensive background in federal and state public policy strategy and advocacy, government relations, administrative law and litigation, privacy, regulatory compliance and general telecommunications legal issues. Susan’s experience includes practicing law in-house, at a law firm, at a state agency, and as a member of industry associations.